Dry lining screws "sinking" into plasterboard.


Postby bemused » Tue Mar 03, 2009 3:49 pm

I've just boarded a ceiling and two walls with 12.5mm plasterboard and used 1.25" drylining screws. Some of them have sunk quite deep into the board thanks to enthusiastic use of the electric screwdriver. It ocurred to me that I don't know how deep I should go. Presumeably I need to get at least flush with the surface, but should I "break" the paper layer? What if I do, is it really bad news in the sense of the board hanging on?

Grateful for comments.
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Postby rosebery » Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:26 pm

As your other thread concerns the bathroom I'm assuming this is about the bathroom as well. Yes?

If you are having the ceiling skimmed then the screws should be just below the level of the board. That stops the clumsy spread catching his trowel on them! LoL.

It doesn't matter if they have gone in further but you might like to add a few more where they have gone in deep.

Ditto walls.

On the walls you can tile direct onto the plasterboard or you can skim it first. What weight of tiles (kg per sqm) are you planning to use?

Have you got a shower going in? If you've already boarded that area the you'll need to tank before tiling.

Cheers

Cheers
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Postby kbrownie » Tue Mar 03, 2009 8:33 pm

If your using cordless driver adjust your torque, you should just be breaking skin of board so screw is slightly counter sunk in to board and not proud of it.
KB
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Postby bemused » Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:52 pm

rosebery, kb,

Many thanks and yes, it is the never-ending bathroom!

The two walls will be tiled full height but I don't know what weight the tiles will be as we haven't decided finally on the design. I have used 1.5" screws on the walls about every 6" or so. In the new shower area I'm going to use aquapanel.

I tried to rely on the driver torque setting but as the studs are original timbers from the lathe & plaster days they are now quite hard, so the torque sensing kind of didn't notice when the screw head hit the plaster board. Maybe I'll just take more care on the remaining walls.
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Postby rosebery » Fri Mar 06, 2009 8:49 pm

"In the new shower area I'm going to use aquapanel."

Good idea. Don't even consider skimming it. You'll have wasted your money on the aquapanel as you might just has well have used cheaper plasterboard. BTW plaster doesn't stick to aquapanel very well anyway.

"Maybe I'll just take more care on the remaining walls."

Seems a sound plan.

Cheers
rosebery
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Postby wws4029 » Sun Apr 12, 2009 3:53 pm

Would also in future consider using 9.5mm plasterboard on the ceilings, will help resolve any issues with screws/nails pulling through as its a much lighter board.#

Hardibacker is a good alternative to aquapanel as well.
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Postby rosebery » Sun Apr 12, 2009 9:43 pm

"Would also in future consider using 9.5mm plasterboard on the ceilings, will help resolve any issues with screws/nails pulling through as its a much lighter board.#"

Agree - I always use 9mm on the ceiling. But in this case the problem is not screws pulling through its the OP driving them in too far!


"Hardibacker is a good alternative to aquapanel as well."

But not nearly so water resistant.

Cheers
rosebery
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Postby ricky68 » Sat Apr 18, 2009 7:03 pm

why would any one want to use 9mm board on a ceiling,the screws are not set right is nothing to do with the weight of the board,its all in the knack of the screwing up
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Postby rosebery » Sun Apr 19, 2009 6:41 pm

"why would any one want to use 9mm board on a ceiling",

well I do when overboarding.


"the screws are not set right is nothing to do with the weight of the board,its all in the knack of the screwing up"

exactly so in this case. Didn't I say that in the previous post?
rosebery
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Postby wws4029 » Mon Apr 27, 2009 9:38 am

[quote="ricky68"]why would any one want to use 9mm board on a ceiling,the screws are not set right is nothing to do with the weight of the board,its all in the knack of the screwing up[/quote]

Don't know?? Maybe because its lighter and easier to fit!!!!

Been a plasterer for 14 years and NEVER used 12.5mm on ceiling. Why make the job hard for yourself?

And have you never had screws pull through?? ever??? As I said lighter board.

I do however agree that screws need to be set right, but ' pull throughs' still happen!
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Postby ricky68 » Mon Apr 27, 2009 7:03 pm

another reason the screws will pop is just bad timber work.the reason i dont use 9mmm is that i board for a living,by using 12mm board they are easy for me as when on my own i dont use a deadman and the 12mm are more ridged.try putting soundblock up on your own.
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Postby rosebery » Mon Apr 27, 2009 11:21 pm

This thread is going a tad off-topic!!

Cheers
rosebery
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