Flood Problem After Neighbouring Development


Postby greengrass » Fri Dec 27, 2013 11:13 pm

A friend and around six neighbours have rear gardens facing a former college ground now a housing estate. Since the ground has been developed accommodating considerable amount of properties, my friend and their neighbours have been plagued by garden flooding.
A land engineer suggested they do away with the gardens have them chipped and use tubs for planting at their OWN expense, In other words. we don't give a monkey you have lost the use of your garden as it was before development I wonder if he would accept a neighbour flooding his garden and saying the same!.

Without going in to waffling details what could be the cause of flooding?, I guess there would be several reasons.I am wondering if this sort of thing is covered under the 'Human rights a
Many thanks for your time.
Happy new year to all including the forum staff. (crawling now)
ct'
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Postby proptech » Sat Dec 28, 2013 11:01 am

Hi greengrass
you are confirming what I've been saying the last few days, that some of the flood problems we are experiencing right now must be indirectly due to the increase in population.

I've no idea of the legal situation your friend has, but I would have thought that the developer would be responsible to provide adequate surface drainage. No doubt that's not now possible.

There may be other ways of draining these gardens, but that could only be investigated through a site survey with an expert on the subject.

I've been no help at all have I ?
So, I'll just second your 'crawling', and wish you, and all at the forum a very happy new year.
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Postby greengrass » Sat Dec 28, 2013 10:52 pm

Thanks proptech its a difficult subject to give a positive reply not being on site to see what's what.
It is 2yrs past but as the developer has done nothing to alleviate the problem I believe it could still be considered a 'live' case, and if they all got together they might be able to get a court enforcement to get the developer on board again to do what should be done and stop the flooding. My feelings are the 'French drain' install one between on the developed land between bordering the flooded gardens.
all the best for new year.
greengrass
Posts: 181
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:27 pm


Postby collectors » Wed Jan 01, 2014 12:02 pm

Your friend has a real pain of a situation, in that he has to prove it’s the developers fault & undoubtedly get involved with a professional survey of the site & then a legal fight. It can sometimes be cheaper to just solve it your selves & possibly ask the developer for help in doing it. He might be more amicable this way. (Not fare, I know)
It might all be down to what area you live in & the ease of fitting a French drain with a one or 2 soak ways.
If there was a clear route & good access made buy your friends for the drains to be fitted? It could be just a 2 day job with a mini excavator & 2 guys.
Good luck. Good site for info on drains http://www.pavingexpert.com/drain08.html
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Postby greengrass » Thu Jan 02, 2014 12:14 pm

[quote="collectors"]Your friend has a real pain of a situation, in that he has to prove it’s the developers fault & undoubtedly get involved with a professional survey of the site & then a legal fight. It can sometimes be cheaper to just solve it your selves & possibly ask the developer for help in doing it. He might be more amicable this way. (Not fare, I know)
It might all be down to what area you live in & the ease of fitting a French drain with a one or 2 soak ways.
If there was a clear route & good access made buy your friends for the drains to be fitted? It could be just a 2 day job with a mini excavator & 2 guys.
Good luck. Good site for info on drains http://www.pavingexpert.com/drain08.html[/quote]

Using your quote facility:
Thanks for your input thought I'd try to gain more on this subject, proof I think is the fact the contractor attended a council/resident meeting when flooding started and promised to lay land drains in their gardens to connect to their s/w manhole but they had tuition from government and did an 'About turn'. I think attending the meeting was proof they knew it was the development that was causing the flooding. And the suggestion by their site engineer to do away with the gardens was a 'smack in the mouth' as it was said he added 'At your own expense' that's they type they are dealing with and their borough councillor was useless.
greengrass
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Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 7:27 pm


Postby welsh brickie » Mon Jan 06, 2014 7:14 pm

contact the environment agency, an on site survey is required to assess the situation, ask them to provide a report, you may have to pay,and armed with this go to a lawyer a threat of legal action with the report should be enough to make them sort out the problem
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