Flueless fire...location of ventilation


Postby deadboyfriend » Sun Nov 09, 2008 7:48 pm

Guys and Gals...i've read through the existing posts and fully understand that purpose provided ventilation is required for a flueless fire...i also understand that some people think they are dangerous, but i've got one and it's installed now...so i'll have to live with it.

My question is about the positioning of the ventilation, the manufacturers instructions say that there must be purpose provided ventilation but they're not very specific on it's location, they do specify that it must'nt be immediately adjacent to the fire as this would effect the oxygen depletion system.

I'm really unhappy about drilling a huge hole in the wall for ventilation, firstly where we live it'll let alot of outside noise into the room, and secondly, we've got double glazing, cavity wall insulation and all the trimmings, and it just seems completely backwards to put a huge hole in the wall and allow draft and noise to enter the room.

What i'd like to do is put a vent in the floor under a piece of furniture or in another discreet location and use the ventilation provided by the airbricks under the floor.

Is this sufficient, are there are draconian rules preventing me from doing this?

Currently we have nothing but only use the fire with a small window open to provide a free flow of oxygen, but this isn't ideal and i know this is against the rules!

Can someone advise me on this?

Thanks

Simon
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Postby Steve the gas » Mon Nov 10, 2008 4:30 am

Hi Simon,

You may end up dead if you don't install a vent rapid!!
On the floor is ok as long as air flow is free of obstruction.the size will be a minimum of 100cm2 but check the fire MI for the size.
Please do this ASAP,or there will be a lack of posts on here from YOU.
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Postby deadboyfriend » Mon Nov 10, 2008 9:48 am

Thanks for this, i have the week off work to complete some jobs so this'll be my first task of the day.

The MI states 100cm2 which is fine, as i say it was just the prospect of knocking a permanent hole in the wall for a fire that we may only have for a couple of years, plus all the draft and noise that was putting me off.

Thanks

Simon
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Postby htg engineer » Mon Nov 10, 2008 11:45 am

"I'm really unhappy about drilling a huge hole in the wall for ventilation, firstly where we live it'll let alot of outside noise into the room, and secondly, we've got double glazing, cavity wall insulation and all the trimmings, and it just seems completely backwards to put a huge hole in the wall and allow draft and noise to enter the room."

You would be better off fitting a vent through the wall as you described - as for the above statement about the cavity insulation, double glazing etc etc You should have taken this into consideration when purchasing the fire - you MUST have ventilation.

Fiiting vents where the air will be taken from under the floor is not normally advised anymore - because of the risks of Radon gas:

"Radon is a colorless, odorless, tasteless radioactive gas that's formed during the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water. Radon exits the ground and can seep into your home through cracks and holes in the foundation. Radon gas can also contaminate well water.
Health officials have determined that radon gas is a carcinogen that can cause lung cancer. Studies show that radon is more of a risk to smokers, but nonsmokers have a slightly elevated chance of developing lung cancer when radon levels in the home are high. The only way to find out if your house contains radon gas is to perform radon tests."

You can normally check with your local authority to see if there's been any cases or warnings in your area.

Personally I'd put the vent through the wall, don't use the fire, or get rid of the fire.


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