Freestanding Gas cooker


Postby Degsy » Mon Mar 24, 2008 1:22 pm

This is posted on behalf of a relative...

Is it necessary to have a CORGI plumber to replace a free standing gas cooker? The old one had a bayonet type hose and it is just a straight swap over.

The reason for asking is that there was a fault with the electrics noted before the cooker was connected to the gas and a Hotpoint engineer was called out who virtually took the cooker to bits and found a stripped wire which was shorting on the case. He left a warning notice saying the cooker hadnt been fitted at his inspection but the gas outlet was incorrectly orientated (Although it was pointing down and always been like that) and no hold down device was in place. Hold down 'L' brackets were fitted and the hose plugged into the bayonet fitting. All worked OK but when the oven and all rings are put on flame came from around the knobs! No leak (or smell of gas is present) when all the knobs are turned off

Obviously something wasnt put back right when the fitter took the cooker to bits when looking for the electrical fault. Hotpoint have been called back.

Are they at risk for connecting the cooker themselves? i.e. Is it legal to replace a free standing like for like appliance?
Degsy
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Postby htg engineer » Tue Mar 25, 2008 4:56 pm

I have just had a job today, central heating not working.

I repaired the boiler, carried out all the checks - came to carry out a tightness test and there was a full drop (20mbar in under 2 minutes).

The gas leak was on a DIY installed freestanding cooker installation, they thought that coating the pipe, fittings and bayonet is rocol paste would make a gas tight seal.

You do need a CORGI registered installer to install a gas appliance legally.
That is why the gas cookers don't come with gas hoses provided anymore.

I have heard that they may stop selling gas hoses spare parts etc etc to anyone that cannot provide a valid CORGI card - let's hope they do, and fairly quick.
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Postby Degsy » Thu Mar 27, 2008 10:01 am

Hi htg engineer

Thanks for your reply.

I agree with you whole heartedly about DIY'ers not being allowed to do gas. However I do think that there should be other competant person registration bodies other than CORGI. (Similar to electrical competant person schemes eg NICEIC, NAPPIT, ELECSA.....). Its a monopoly and I consider it wrong.

As far as I am aware it isn't illegal to do gas pipework but a CORGI guy would have to do the final connection and carry out a gas tightness test. I know plumbers who cant justify the CORGI Registration fee due to the type of work they get and do the same thing.

I am not a plumber but i consider myself to be a competant one (I'm a Joiner by trade but now a Building Inspector). I do have a City & Guilds Construction qualification which included plumbing for 2 years. I recently fitted a new boiler myself and ran a new gas supply to it. I then paid a CORGI heating engineer to make the final connection. He said he would guarantee there would be a drop. He tested for 20mins and there wasnt a single drop. He was amazed. He then removed a gas heater and capped the pipe and tested again.....it leaked! (Which I found highly amusing) On a separate occasion TRANSCO came and did some work to my gas supply as I was getting water in my system due to a leak in a cast iron pipe in the road. The water had got past my meter and they had to cut into my "Domestic" pipework on my property to drain it. Again, when they reinstated it and tested there was a leak!

My point is that when you do a job day in and day out you tend to get somewhat complacent, whereas when I did the gas I was meticulous in getting my pipework correct.

I do understand the dangers of DIY Gas but there should be scope for someone to be able to prove they are competant enough to carry out installations provided a Qualified person can test and certify.
Degsy
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Postby Degsy » Thu Mar 27, 2008 10:32 am

PS. When fitting the boiler, the CORGI guy did check the pipe runs I had installed to check the pipe sizing was correct, and the flue gases with a probe. I did make a Building Notice application which was checked by a BCO and a completion Certificate issued.
Degsy
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Postby htg engineer » Thu Mar 27, 2008 4:01 pm

At the end of the day it's entirely up to your relative, i've gave my opinion, my house and family are safe.

Yes even heating engineers, gas fitters have gas escapes, but they detect/find them and repair. They know the limits of permissable gas escapes.

I have seen joiners cut wood too short, drill a hole for a door handle in the wrong place - these things happen - tradesmen can put them right DIYers can't/don't.
htg engineer
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Postby tsb » Sun Mar 30, 2008 10:59 pm

Totally agree about the corgi issue being a monopoly. Still plenty of cowboys out there who are corgi members. Also any applience fitted now has to be notified to corgi, so that they can send you a letter saying it was fitted by a corgi member.( abit like big brother really) so don't know how you would get round this, because I wouldn't sign anyones else's work off, saying I've fitted it, when I haven't
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Postby Degsy » Mon Mar 31, 2008 8:39 am

Turns out when Hotpoint came and stripped the cooker down, the previous electrical fault (Which was a stripped wire caused at manufacture stage) had shorted against the copper gas pipe adjacent a ring and blown a small hole in it. As a result Hotpoint are supplying a new cooker and fitting it for free....so all has turned out OK anyway.....or so my relative thinks!!!

I assume the gas tightness test is carried out when the appliance is turned off? Therefore, as the problem only occurred when the ring was turned on surely this wouldnt have been detected and repaired as Htg engineer suggests?

Seems to me that as the Hotpoint engineer that sorted the electrical fault (who was CORGI) was negligent in the fact that he didnt test the appliance after fixing the electrical fault? He replaced the wire so obviously should have seen the flash burn on the pipe? Sort of proves my (and tsb's) point that being CORGI doesn't guarantee competancy no matter what exams you take??? Apparently this guy came in a Hotpoint van so he isn't just some local sub-contractor. I would be wary of letting them fit the new cooker myself....but its not my choice. Out of interest, what would be the cost of fitting a cooker by a 'qualified' corgi fitter??
Degsy
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Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2008 12:01 pm


Postby htg engineer » Tue Apr 01, 2008 10:38 am

Stupid money, I have known of some to charge £85+ just to connect hose, plug in and test.
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