knocking into a garage for dining room.


Postby jimboevo4 » Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:50 pm

Hi, just bought a new house, well bungalow. The garage is adjoined to the house. The front is level with where the kitchen wall ends and the rear of the garage goes beyond the back wall of the kitchen which is beyond the house.
What I am wanting to do is knock the small side wall of the kitchen through making a large kitchen dining area.
Then also at the far end of the garage which extends beyod the house making this a conservatory area. However having this all open, not as seperate walls.
I am aware that the single skin wall of the garage will need to have an additional wall added and be insulated, as will all other single skin walls.
Im just wondering what if any parts of this are likely to neep planning permission. And will there be any problems with the conservatory part not being a seperate area?
Cheers James.
jimboevo4
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 3:42 pm

Sponsor

Online roofing products and solutions

Postby LCL » Fri Sep 14, 2007 4:36 pm

This will certainly require building regulation approval and may require planning consent as your garage will be viewed by the LPA (local planning authority) as a car parking space (which you will lose). I'd suggest you give your LPA a call as they will be able to advise you on local planning issues.

If the works are done to the building regulations either on a building notice or full plans, there will be certain issues you'll need to resolve such as water penetration through a single skin wall, insulation etc.

If you are planning to have the conservatory all open with the house, be prepared for an uphill struggle with building control. Broadly speaking 25% of the floor area of your house can be openings in external walls, ie doors and windows. Having an open conservatory will supercede this in a massive way and the building inspector will wish to see compensatory heat loss measures put in place to ensure that the heat loss from the dwelling will be no worse that the dwelling without the conservatory!

Sound confusing? it certainly can be. Seek advice from a local Architect or Chartered Building Surveyor. You can go it alone, but i'd have thought the advice from such a person will pay dividends in the long run.

Hope this helps.

LCL
LCL
Posts: 139
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:40 pm


Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by


 


  • Related Topics