Removing plaster & lath artexed ceiling


Postby diy247 » Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:31 pm

Hi

I wish to remove a kitchen ceiling (single storey ) as the internal height is just 2000mm on one side and the swirly pattern artex looks hideous. From a tiny hole I can see it is plaster and lath construction. Is it safe (albeit messy) to remove it? Is it likely to contain asbestos? The house is circa 1930 but I don't know that the offshoot is original.

I can't afford to lose more height through boarding it.

Any help appreciated.

Regards
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Postby welsh brickie » Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:53 pm

its highly unlikely it will be asbestos,Ceiling and wall partitions were plastered using lime/sand render ,mixed with horse hair to add strength.
wear a partical mask and gloves when removing it though.
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Postby JRS » Mon Mar 21, 2011 8:15 pm

Be careful tho, It might decide to come down as 1, The artex may contain asbestos,
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Postby diy247 » Mon Mar 21, 2011 9:40 pm

Many thanks :)
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Postby chris_on_tour2002 » Thu Mar 24, 2011 11:33 pm

asbestos was commonly used in artex up until about 25 years ago which if you think about it is fairly recent. artex was very fashionable in the 80s and 90s so there is a chance that asbestos will be present.

although it was the relatively less harmful white asbestos that was used, as opposed to the grey, you should still take precautions.

remove it with a wallpaper steamer prior to pulling down the ceiling. a pain of a job but it will get it off and it will keep it wet. it's the dust that you want to avoid. if in any doubt get a specialist in to check it out.

the lath plaster is unlikely to contain asbestos - a bigger threat, believe it or not, is anthrax infection! as welsh brickie says horsehair was mixed in with the plaster as a binder and anthrax can lay dormant for decades in the hair itself. anthrax is a bacterial infection found in cattle, horses and other plant eating mammals. on exposure to air and moisture the bacteria can miraculously spring back to life.

in reality though, the risk is extremely low and documented cases of people being infected through this kind of exposure in the building trade are incredibly rare. furthermore your house is 1930s built and anthrax control measures had long been in place by then so your risk really is minimal.

nonetheless whenever carrying out any dusty work a decent respirator should always be used - don't scrimp. the paper ones are inadequate for all but the lightest of sanding jobs in my opinion, spend 25 quid on a decent one with the proper filters. and let me tell you now removing lath plaster ceilings in one dusty, filthy job. enjoy!
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Postby diy247 » Sat Mar 26, 2011 2:37 am

Thank you Chris

Anthrax! Yikes!

I will be careful, and follow your instructions. I will tape the doorway into the dining room and cover everything too. The room will be empty as this is the first job of revamping the room.

The artex probably does date from when you suggest. There are several cracks in it, probably to hide damage in the original ceiling. I did consider skimming it, and putting faux beams in, but the condition doesn't really allow this - and in any case, I can't afford to lose more height.

One more question - I was planning to board in between the beams, leaving them partially exposed. Should I treat the exposed beams with anything afterwards, given that this a kitchen (with a low ceiling) ?

Many thanks
diy247
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:57 pm


Postby welsh brickie » Sat Mar 26, 2011 2:01 pm

[quote="chris_on_tour2002"]asbestos was commonly used in artex up until about 25 years ago which if you think about it is fairly recent. artex was very fashionable in the 80s and 90s so there is a chance that asbestos will be present.

although it was the relatively less harmful white asbestos that was used, as opposed to the grey, you should still take precautions.

remove it with a wallpaper steamer prior to pulling down the ceiling. a pain of a job but it will get it off and it will keep it wet. it's the dust that you want to avoid. if in any doubt get a specialist in to check it out.

the lath plaster is unlikely to contain asbestos - a bigger threat, believe it or not, is anthrax infection! as welsh brickie says horsehair was mixed in with the plaster as a binder and anthrax can lay dormant for decades in the hair itself. anthrax is a bacterial infection found in cattle, horses and other plant eating mammals. on exposure to air and moisture the bacteria can miraculously spring back to life.

in reality though, the risk is extremely low and documented cases of people being infected through this kind of exposure in the building trade are incredibly rare. furthermore your house is 1930s built and anthrax control measures had long been in place by then so your risk really is minimal.

nonetheless whenever carrying out any dusty work a decent respirator should always be used - don't scrimp. the paper ones are inadequate for all but the lightest of sanding jobs in my opinion, spend 25 quid on a decent one with the proper filters. and let me tell you now removing lath plaster ceilings in one dusty, filthy job. enjoy![/quote]


I never knew that about artex or anthrax in horse hair,I have recently developed a twich,That could explain it..
thanks for the warning chris..
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2008 7:54 am


Postby gorge » Mon Mar 28, 2011 9:48 pm

Please be aware: years of scaremongering has gone on. The reality is a lot of money has been made on this subject! Please read all the articles on this link below and stop yourselves from worrying about artex. Yes of course take precautions but I have been assured that the removal done a few years ago by a workman which resulted in the whole house being covered in artex dust, whilst my family were living there caused no problems and absolutely no reason to be concerned over. Furthermore, i have cracks in my artex ceilings which I was also worried about. I was so grateful for this assurance and what I have learned from this site I vowed to spread the word.
Google "asbestoswatchdog.co.uk/science/home"
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