Shower in Utility room


Postby Orhaniye » Sat Nov 29, 2008 6:33 pm

Have just had a new extension utility room built. It was architect designed and was always designed as utility/ shower room as shown on plans.
Have just been told by electrician that under part P cannot have shower within reach of appliances, hard to avoid in room 1.7m x 2.2m.
Can anyone enlighten me on what is allowed? Is the shower a definite no no?
Many thanks.
Orhaniye
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 6:24 pm

Sponsor

Simply Build It

Postby sparx » Sat Nov 29, 2008 8:28 pm

Hi, first I think the use of 'Part-P' comment is irrelevant!
So many people miss the point, bldg regs are mainly to prevent incorrect installation METHODS it's the IEE regs that hold sway here, & in my opinion it may be possible to carry on with your installation.
As this is not a bathroom it comes under the same rules as say a bedroom with shower en-suite.
All outlets must be RCD protected, and depending upon distance from shower may need to be IP56 rated ie use 'outdoor' type sockets which close around fitted plugs, the sockets should be an arms length from a person using shower which may need some thought but should be possible even in a small room.
The point here is not proximity of washing/drying machines but the connection point of them.
Ensure local equipotential bonding is in place and connected to main earth at local circuit, such as from socket wiring.
Can't quote exact reg says it's OK but also can't find one that says it's not,
your problem is to find a leckie who is happy to do & certify it, I would but it's a personal interpretation,
sure others will see it differently,
Regards SPARX
sparx
Rank: Project Manager
Posts: 2166
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:33 pm
Location: The fifth continent.

Postby ericmark » Sun Nov 30, 2008 6:46 am

There are a number of points if the shower screen is over 2.25 meters high then the area within the screen will be counted as its own room so you can fit anything outside the screen. Fig 701.1
The bedroom rule has now gone and all rooms with bath or shower are allowed sockets over 3 meters horizontal away from the bath or shower tray. 701.512.3
There is no Zone 3 any more and Zone 2 extends 0.60 meters horizontal away from shower there is only a restriction on socket outlets not connection units outside Zone 2.
In the older versions of the IEE requirements for electrical Installations there was a distance from a sink etc. But not since they became BS7671 as to Part P it refers to an obsolete version of BS7671 i.e. BS7671:2001 rather than BS7671:2008 and the rules on rooms containing bath or shower have changed.
With your problem I would say only way around it would be to ensure the shower screen is high enough.
Odd but 1.9 meters rather than 2.25 meters seems to be standard height.
Unless the 2.25 meter height or reaches the roof then any electrical connection will require a key or tool to access. So hard wired would be OK.
There are also as Sparx says other changes in that all electrical items within a room containing bath or shower now need to be RCD protected including the lights but some of the earthing regulations have been relaxed.
Eric
ericmark

Postby Orhaniye » Sun Nov 30, 2008 1:11 pm

Many thanks for such informed replies. Will run it past my electrician and see what he says. May be back later to consult the sages.
Thanks again.
Andrew
Orhaniye
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 6:24 pm

Postby Orhaniye » Sun Nov 30, 2008 5:48 pm

Hi. Back again with further question...
If I understand you right, with a normal size shower screen- if the appliances are hard wired to an RCD protected power point (which will be 1.4m from shower) or to a point outside the room, then that is perfectly ok?
Andrew
Orhaniye
Rank: Labourer
Progress to next rank:
50%
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2008 6:24 pm

Postby ericmark » Mon Dec 01, 2008 4:49 am

Yes the rules will allow it but that does not mean it is perfectly ok. The regulations do not say "you can do this" they say "you can't do that" so following regulations is not so straight forward. For example if the instructions for any of the equipment said it is not suitable that would override general regulations. A simple instruction like the moulded plug should not be removed or the guarantee is invalid would mess it all up.
I would look at making the shower cubical count as a room by extending it until it either touches the roof or is over the 2.25 meters.
There are two ways to look at it.
You can't do that because
or
To do that you need to
The latter is the way you need the electrician to adopt and instead of saying "you can't because" he should be saying "in order to do that you need to" as there is always a way around it.
Eric
ericmark

Display posts from previous
Sort by
Order by



  • DIY How to Project Guides

  • DIY how to tutorial projects and guides - Did you know we have a DIY Projects section? Well, if no, then we certainly do! Within this area of our site have literally hundreds of how-to guides and tutorials that cover a huge range of home improvement tasks. Each page also comes with pictures and a video to make completing those jobs even easier!



 


  • Related Topics