Utility Room Damp problem.


Postby psbresner » Thu May 01, 2008 12:03 pm

Hi Guys,

I bought a house almost a year ago, I believe it was built circa 1900. It appears to have been modernised in the last 10 years or so.

It has a utility room which is basically a single storey extension off the kitchen. The main issue is damp, which I think is caused by the garden being almost at window level against one side of it. It also has no heating so is very cold, I imagine this isn't helping.

It has an asbestos roof and a partial clear plastic sheet section.

Would heating help at all or a waste of money.

Or do I knock it down and rebuild??

Not sure where to start.

Thanks

Paul.
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Postby ALDA » Fri May 02, 2008 6:06 pm

IF YOU REALLY WANT TO KEEP IT, THEN YOU NEED TO LOWER THE LEVEL OF THE GROUND TO 6" BELOW DPC LEVEL.

THIS MAY MEAN HAVING TO BUILD A RETAINING WALL TO KEEP THE EARTH BACK OFF THE WALLS OR SLOPING THE SOIL AWAY.

JUST THROWING HEAT AT THE ROOM WILL NOT SOLVE THE PROBLEM AND WILL EAT AWAY AT YOUR FUEL BUDGET AS DAMP WALLS SUCK THE HEAT OUT OF THE AIR FASTER THAN DRY ONES.

LEAVE THE ROOFING ALONE UNLESS YOU HAVE THE FEW THOUSAND POUNDS THAT WILL BE REQUIRED TO FINANCE THE EXPERT REMOVAL/DISPOSAL OF ASBESTOS AND MORE EXPENSE REPLACING ROOF.

SOUNDS LIKE THERE IS NO CEILING, IN WHICH CASE CONSIDER INSTALLING A ONE AND ADDING VENTILATION AND INSULATION INTO THE VOID (IT WILL BE A BARRIER TO THE ASBESTOS TOO).

DRYLINE WALLS TO ADD INSULATION AND PROVIDE BETTER FINISH.

IF ALL THIS SEEMS LIKE TO MUCH WORK FOR LITTLE REWARD, THEN GET THE EXTENSION EXPERTLY REMOVED/DISPOSED OF BUT AS I SAID BEFORE IT IS AN EXPENSIVE OPTION.

FOOD FOR THOUGHT!

ITS YOUR CHOICE!

ALDA.
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Postby psbresner » Thu May 08, 2008 7:55 am

Hi Alda,

Thanks for the reply.

Yeah we'd like to keep it if at all possible.

In my mind I thought I'd have to build a retaining wall to keep the earth back off the wall.

It does have a ceiling, which looks fine to be honest. Think I'll leave the roofing as is for the time being.

Drying lining is that absolutely necessary if there is a cavity, how do I tell??

Thanks again

Paul. :D
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Postby ALDA » Thu May 08, 2008 10:28 am

PAUL,

I DOUBT THERE WILL BE A CAVITY, ESPECIALLY AS YOU SAY THE DAMP WAS PENERTRATING THE WALL.

THE WALL WILL BE SINGLE BRICK 4-5" THICK OR 10-11" THICK IF CAVITY WALL, LOOK AT DOOR OR WINDOW REVEAL TO ASSESS THIS.

THE FLOOR IS ANOTHER AREA WHERE DAMP MAY BE FINDING ITS WAY IN AND THIS SHOULD BE RESOLVED BEFORE YOU PURSUE ANY DRY LINNING.

AS FOR THE DRY LINNING, IT DEPENDS ON WHAT YOU INTEND TO USE THE ROOM FOR AND WHAT APPEARENCE YOU ARE HAPPY TO LIVE WITH BUT IF YOU HEAT THE ROOM THEN I WOULD SAY IT IS A MUST AND USE INSULATION BOARD.

REGARDS,

ALDA.
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Postby psbresner » Mon May 12, 2008 7:51 am

Hi Alda,

Had a good look and there does appear to be a cavity, I'd say the walls are between 10-12" and one wall has two air vents on the exterior.

The floor seemed fine through the winter, the main problem was condensation and one area of wall that I think was penetrating damp. At the moment that area has a salt mark about 6" off the floor.

The wall with the garden against it doesn't have any markings at all.

Thanks

Paul. :D
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Postby ALDA » Mon May 12, 2008 12:44 pm

HI PAUL,

WITH THE WALLS BEING CAVITY CONSTRUCTION, IT SEAMS LIKELY THAT THE WALL WITH THE SOIL AGAINST IT HAS ITS "CAVITY BRIDGED" AT THE POINT WHERE YOU ARE EXPERIENCING THE PENERTRATING DAMP (REMOVAL OF A BRICK OR TWO WILL CONFIRM THIS AND ENABLE REMOVAL OF MATERIAL CAUSING BRIDGE).

IT MAY BE THAT THE EXTERIOR OF THIS WALL HAS HAD SOME FORM OF BARRIER TO DAMP APPLIED TO IT PRIOR TO THE SOIL BEING LOADED AGAINST THE WALL, THIS MAY ALSO APPLY TO THE FLOOR AREA.

HOWEVER, A WALL WITH SOIL LOADED AGAINST IT WILL BE SUBSTANTIALLY COLDER THAN ONE WITHOUT AND CONSEQUENTLY MORE PRONE TO CONDESATION FORMING ON IT WHEN WARM MOIST AIR COMES INTO CONTACT PARTICULARLY DURING WINTER.

REGARDS,

ALDA.
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Postby psbresner » Wed May 28, 2008 12:28 pm

Hi Alda,

The wall with soil against it isn't the wall that has penetrating damp, the wall that has the penetrating damp is a side wall.

But water does run off the garden and down onto the concrete to the side of this wall. I expect that this is the main issue of the penetrating damp.

As for the excessive condensation that occurs on all walls.

Thanks

pAUL.
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