was about boxing in....now advice re new oil boiler


Postby jb1468 » Tue May 06, 2008 5:10 pm

As part of renovating an old property, I have to remove an unsafe external structure where the external boiler (very old! - grant 50-70 Euroflame compact oil boiler) is currently placed. I need to case or box in the boiler and the pipes leading into the house to protect it from the weather as it will, when I remove the structure, be exposed to the weather. It currently stands on a concrete surface which will remain.

I read around the subject but it is a little confusing regarding clearance regulations and suitable materials. I am considering allowing the following clearances. 200mm above, 50mm left and right, 100 mm front and 25mm all round clearance for the flu. I will construct it in such a way that any part of it can be removed for servicing if required. Does this sound about right, or are their definite regulations. I will be selling the property once renovated so I do not want it to come back and bite me! As the boiler is at least 10 years old I have no manual and cannot find one online.

What materials can I use, best to use? is it ok to use combustible materials such as external ply and felt for the slanted roof of the boiler house? or do I need to be looking at other materials. It needs to be weather proof

Would really appreciate experience, thoughts and advice, particularly from those who have done this.
Last edited by jb1468 on Sat May 10, 2008 9:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby htg engineer » Wed May 07, 2008 7:30 pm

"(very old! - grant 50-70 Euroflame compact oil boiler)"

If it's very old, and you're renovating the property to be sold on, people like to see energy efficient appliances. An old, possibly unreliable boiler can put people off especially first time buyers as they'd struggle to pay the mortgage, never mind decorating and upgrading the heating system.

I don't know your financial status or what you want to do, or expect to spend on the renovation - but an energy efficient boiler located in the house will benefit yourself as it will add value to the property and purchasers as it's one less thing to worry about and even though they'll be paying for in the house price - it seems like a better deal, they'll think it'll be saving them money.

If the boiler is outside i'd imagine alot of heat will be lost before it even gets to the house, even if they're insulated it's not ideal.

Would upgrading the heating system benefit everyone ?
Installed in the house would give more outdoor space and save on constructing a housing for the boiler.

Hope this helps, even though it doesn't answer your question.
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Postby ALDA » Wed May 07, 2008 7:42 pm

JB,

IDEALLY, GET BOILER INSTALLED INTERNALLY.

IF YOU PERSUE YOUR IDEA, CONSIDER HAVING MANUFACTURED, A SHEET METAL LEAN TO BOX (STAINLESS STEEL OR ALUMINIUM) WITH SLOPING ROOF, MAYBE A LOCKING DOOR OR FRONT ACCESS PANEL AND VENTILATION GRILLES INCORPORATED AT YOUR LOCAL METAL BASHING WORKSHOP.

IF NOT ALREADY FITTED, GET A FROST THERMOSTAT CONECTED TO BOILER CONTROLS!!!!

ALDA.
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Postby jb1468 » Thu May 08, 2008 10:49 am

[quote="htg engineer"]"(very old! - grant 50-70 Euroflame compact oil boiler)"

If it's very old, and you're renovating the property to be sold on, people like to see energy efficient appliances. An old, possibly unreliable boiler can put people off especially first time buyers as they'd struggle to pay the mortgage, never mind decorating and upgrading the heating system.

I don't know your financial status or what you want to do, or expect to spend on the renovation - but an energy efficient boiler located in the house will benefit yourself as it will add value to the property and purchasers as it's one less thing to worry about and even though they'll be paying for in the house price - it seems like a better deal, they'll think it'll be saving them money.

If the boiler is outside i'd imagine alot of heat will be lost before it even gets to the house, even if they're insulated it's not ideal.

Would upgrading the heating system benefit everyone ?
Installed in the house would give more outdoor space and save on constructing a housing for the boiler.

Hope this helps, even though it doesn't answer your question.[/quote]

You have got me thinking about this as a viable option. i know very little about central heating/plumbing so would appreciate some direction. i need to keep costs reasonably low as my budget is not huge. if i was to fit a boiler inside (and i do have space in a storage room with a wall to the outside for the flu) could you recommend a few oil boilers (I live in Northern ireland and often cant get best value from companies online as they dont deliver here). Have an old Horstmann programmer and would like to replace with combined programmer/room stat. intend to replace bathroom radiator for towl rad (to save space predominantly) and replace valves on all other rads with TRV's (bar the one where the room stat is placed as i understand i need lockshields on these). i have read around this and think i understand that all this is ok....am i correct. I have a gravity system. have read about bypass valves on mys system but dont understand this. do i need this? or is the plan outlined above ok.
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