How to Use Nuts, Bolts and Washers & When to Use Threaded Bars or Nuts and Bolts

Summary: Which nuts, bolts, washers or threaded bar to use and when they should be used. Learn about fixings for heavy duty construction and more light weight nuts and bolts. Understand which type of bolt should be used for which project.

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Bolts are used to join pieces together either permanently or temporarily. Many steel structures, including buildings, are simply bolted together. For example, the Eiffel Tower in Paris was originally a temporary structure and after twenty years it was to be dismantled. For this reason most of the steel components were bolted together. However, the tower has lasted well over a hundred years. Much of the structure of the Empire State Building in the USA is also bolted together. Nuts and bolts can also be used to fix together small structures such as furniture. Nuts and bolts come in many different types and sizes and some are shown below.

Anchor Fixings

Anchor Fixings

Anchor fixings are mostly used to fix timber and steel to masonry or concrete.

Coach Bolt

Coach Bolt

Coach bolts have a square collar under the domed head and this locks into the wood when the nut is tightened. A washer is normally placed before the nut to stop it sinking into the wood as it is turned. Socket sets and Spanners can be bought from our very own DIY superstore.

Plasterboard Fixing

Plasterboard Fixing

Plasterboard fixings come in all shapes and sizes and the weight of the object you are trying to fix usually determines which type you use. Scroll down to our Top Tools area to purchase plasterboard fixings.

Chemical Fixing Kit

Chemical Fixing Kit

Machine Bolt and Hexagonal Nut

Machine Bolt and Hexagonal Nut

Two spanners are needed to tighten this nut and bolt. The first spanner fits round the hexagonal head of the bolt and a second spanner is used to tighten the hexagonal nut.

Frame Fixing

Frame Fixing

Frame fixings are pushed through a pre drilled hole in the frame and surrounding structure. They are then pushed in so only the metal screw is showing. The screw is then screwed in. Hammer Screws are inserted the same way but the screw is hammered in rather than screwed.

The countersunk machine screw fits level with the surface of the wood/metal/plastic. A screwdriver is used to keep the bolt still whilst the wing nut is tightened by hand.Countersinking can be done with ordinary wood screws also.

Machine Screw and Wing Nut

Machine Screw and Wing Nut

Aercon Anchor

Aercon Anchor

The Aercon Anchor designed to be screwed into airated concrete or blocks to provide a threaded socket enabling a Secure Fixing Point.

Tightening a wing nut

Tightening a wing nut

Wing nuts are used to make the adjustment of a secured object as easy as possible.

Wood Nails

Wood Nails

Plain Washer

Plain Washer

A plain washer prevents the nut sinking into the surface of the wood/plastic/metal.

Wall Plugs

Wall Plugs

Spring Washer

Spring Washer

If there is a need to prevent A nut and bolt loosening a spring washer is used.

Below is an example of a concrete bolt

Concrete Bolt

Concrete Bolt

With thanks to V. Ryan from  www.technologystudent.com who has copyright on all of the images shown here.

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